November 2018   
SMTWTFS
    123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930 
     
Upcoming Events
NOV

13

TUE
Men's Bible Study
8:00 AM
Every Tuesday at the downtown McDonalds, 8:00 a.m.
NOV

14

WED
Midweek Activities
6:00 PM
Preschool, Children, The Mission (Youth Worship) and Adult Bible Study, Weekly Worker's and Officers Meeting
NOV

18

SUN
Mission Ardmore
6:00 PM to 6:45 PM
Outreach to Newcomers to Ardmore
Bible Search
The Strategy of the World (chapter 1:1-7)
Thriving in Babylon
The Strategy of the World
Daniel 1:1-7
 
This evening we are beginning a brand-new series called Daniel: Living in Babylon. I'm not sure if I've ever preached through this book, although I found a lot of sermons that I had preached from Daniel in my files. 
 
I think back in 2009 I did a series dealing with the prophecies of Daniel regarding the last days.  But hopefully, what we'll look at over the next several weeks will be fresh and insightful.  I can promise you it is not something I've pulled out of the file that I've preached before, because I couldn't find anything! 
 
There are several reasons I think it timely to study this book.
 
First, the setting and time of Daniel's life parallel our own very closely. For most of his life, Daniel lived as part of a believing minority in a majority pagan culture, thus the title of the series, Living in Babylon.
 
From the time he was a teenager until he died around the age of 90, he served under a series of pagan kings.  He never had the luxury of living in a country surrounded by people who believed as he did and because of that, he offers us a lot of good information and useful principles as we attempt to live for Christ in a world filled with people who do not share our faith.
 
 
Second, I think there is a high likelihood that some of us in this room will be alive when some of Daniel’s prophecies are fulfilled. This book is filled with dreams, visions, and prophecies about the end times and there are some amazing similarities between what Daniel recorded and what we are seeing happen in the world today.
 
Third, Daniel’s God is our God too and it is important for us to be reminded that He is still on the throne.  In fact, I think the most important truth we can ever draw from this text or any other is that God is in charge!
 
And Daniel helps us to see that He is in charge of nations, families, and individuals. He is in charge of the past, the present, and the future. He is in charge of good times and bad days, of happiness and sorrow, of joy and heartache, of great victories and shocking defeats. He is in charge when a child is born and he is in charge when death knocks at your door.
 
And studying this book provides us some reminders of those truths through the real-life experiences of people who put their trust in a God Who makes no mistakes.
 
And perhaps less important, but noteworthy is the fact that Daniel is a fun and interesting book to study.  This book has it all: history … prophecy … politics … prayer … lions … statues … wild animals … a fiery furnace … dreams and visions … a king who thought he was a cow … incredible adventure … amazing escapes … angels … demons … detailed information about ancient history … and amazing prophesies about the end times.
And it is extremely practical because at its core it tells us how we should live in a world where believers are outnumbered and often overwhelmed. 
 
That means for modern readers it helps us know how to respond to things like abortion, euthanasia, and gay rights, the outright hatred of Christians, and the rising tide of persecution around the world. 
 
Daniel provides a positive model for how to live for God when no one else shares your faith, when it seems like God is absent in the midst of a pagan culture, and how to proclaim Christ in a world that doesn’t even believe in the concept of truth.
 
Now, you should know some of the background of the book to understand its message, so let me give you a couple of things to keep in mind. Daniel lived approximately 400 years after David and 600 years before Jesus. The book covers the period 605 BC to about 530 BC. In the beginning Daniel is a teenager, approximately 15 years old.
 
When the book closes, he is about 90 years old. During his long life God allowed him to serve under a succession of Babylonian and Persian rulers. From being an imported hostage, he becomes a trusted prime minister and counselor to some of the mightiest rulers in world history.
 
When the book opens we find Daniel and his friends being forcibly taken from their homes in Jerusalem and deported to Babylon. There these godly teens will undergo an enormous cultural transformation as they are trained to work for a pagan king.
 
Three main players take the stage in the opening verses. First, there is Nebuchadnezzar and the Babylonians. They represent the world system that is hostile to the people of God. Remember that Babylon in the Bible is always (with no exceptions) a symbol for evil and anti-god paganism.
 
What starts with the Tower of Babel in Genesis 11 comes to a climax in Revelation 17-18 as the entire world system is finally destroyed at the Second Coming of Christ.
 
Second, there is Daniel and his three friends.  They represent the believer in the world, striving to obey God in the midst of much spiritual opposition.
 
Finally, there is God Himself Who leaves His children in the world and yet purposes to bring them safely to glory in the end. He never speaks a word, yet he is the One behind the scenes orchestrating events to bring about his desired ends.
 
As I meditated on this passage it seemed to be an object lesson on how the world tries to seduce the church. What starts with a frontal assault becomes a very subtle attempt at total assimilation.
 
In the midst of all the circumstances that unfold, we focus in on these four teenage boys who somehow find the courage to say no to temptation and yes to God and through them we get a very vivid picture of how the world tries to attack the church.
 
First of all,
 
 
 
1. The World Seeks to Destroy Our Heritage
 
Daniel 1:1
 
I find it instructive that this book begins with total humiliating defeat. The very first verse takes us back to 605 BC as the armies of Nebuchadnezzar surround the capital city of Israel. We know from history that eventually the king of Babylon had his way and overran the city’s defenses. From that day onward the temple, the city, all the things that mattered most, fell into the hands of the pagans.
 
This led to the first deportation. A second one followed in 597 BC And in 586 BC the Babylonians attacked again, this time utterly destroying Solomon’s Temple, leaving the city in ruins and the walls torn down.
 
Daniel and his friends were taken to Babylon in the first wave of deportees. Now they are far from home and separated from all they have known. How will they worship God without a temple, without sacrifices, and while living among unbelievers?
 
The world today attempts do the same thing minus the physical captivity.  There is a concerted, concentrated attempt taking place today to rewrite the Christian heritage of America. 
 
The reasoning is, I suppose, if we can just rewrite history and remove any reference to God and His hand, then the strength and influence of the Christian faith will be crippled. 
 
 
So just know, Satan attacks today in our Babylon just as he did then, with this frontal assault on the people of God by seeking to separate us from our heritage and removing us from our own past.
 
Second,
 
2. The World Seeks to Deconstruct our Faith
 
Daniel 1:2
 
Nebuchadnezzar took the articles from the temple (various worship objects made from gold and silver) and brought them back to Babylon with him. He then placed them in the temple of the chief god of Babylon, called Bel or Marduk.
 
It was an intentional mockery of Israel's religion and thus their societal life, meant to signify Israel’s complete defeat. The message was clear: Our god is greater than your god. By looting the temple, he thought he had defeated the God of Israel.
 
But there is more to this than just pagan boasting. Many years earlier, during a period of spiritual decline, the Israelites had brought the symbols of other gods into their temple.
 
Now God allows a pagan king to take his treasures into a pagan temple. Such is God’s righteous judgment. No principle in the Bible is so well established as this: What goes around, comes around. The Jews had desecrated their own temple through consorting with idols, now God allows the pagans to come in and do the same thing.
 
From a worldly point of view it appeared that God was dead. How else to explain the looting of the dwelling place of the one true God? And that raises a crucial question: Can we trust a God who is defeated?
 
Can you trust God when all the evidence suggests he is dead? Will you be faithful even when your world falls apart? Is your God greater than your circumstances?
 
In 1845 James Russell Lowell wrote the famous poem “The Present Crisis.” It includes this well-known stanza:
 
Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne,—
 
Yet that scaffold sways the future, and, behind the dim unknown,
 
Standeth God within the shadow, keeping watch above his own.
 
All was not lost, although the looting of the temple made it seem that the Lord had been defeated and the Babylonians had won the Battle of the Gods.
 
Third,
 
3. The World Seeks to Reconstruct Our Values
 
Daniel 1:3-5
 
It’s helpful to know that starting with this verse, everything else in the book of Daniel takes place in Babylon.
From this point on, Daniel is away from his homeland and as far as we know, he never returned, not even for a visit.
 
It begins with a selection process aimed at the cream of the crop of Jewish teenage boys. The king assigns them to Ashpenaz, his right-hand man. He then makes sure they get the best education Babylon can offer. For three years they will be immersed in Babylonian knowledge, culture, history, language, and religion. At the end of that time they would enter the king’s service and be assured of high-level government positions.
 
This is very clever and also very seductive. Mind control always begins with the young. Nebuchadnezzar called in his Vice-President of Human Resources—Ashpenaz, and gave him a three-step plan for re-educating these sharp young Jewish teenagers.
 
Step one was a full scholarship to Babylon State University, the Ivy League of the ancient world. There they would learn science, math, astrology, commerce, and history.
 
Step two was to offer them free food from the King’s Buffet. It was all-you-can-eat all the time. I’m sure we all understand this. Even back then they knew that the way to a young man’s heart is through his stomach.
 
Step three involved changing their names (verses 6-7).
 
 
So these three Jewish teenagers are now on the fast-track Babylonian assimilation program. It’s like being given a full scholarship to MIT or like being singled out by the boss’s right-hand man for special mentoring. Talk about a sweet deal, this was it.
 
It was the kind of break most guys would jump at. And to be fair we have to say that Nebuchadnezzar didn’t think of it as an evil thing. He probably thought he was doing these young men an incredible favor. And Ashpenaz was just doing his job as well.
 
4. The World Seeks to Undermine Our Identity
 
Daniel 1:6-7
 
Although it isn’t obvious from the English text, all these names had special meanings. The Hebrew names all contained references to the God of Israel.
The new Babylonian names mention the gods of Babylon.
 
Daniel ("God is my Judge") became Belteshazzar ("Bel, protect the King").
 
Hananiah ("The Lord is gracious") became Shadrach ("Command of Aku”, the Sumerian sun-god).
 
Mishael ("Who is like the Lord?") became Meshach ("Who is what Aku is?").
 
Azariah ("The Lord is my helper") became Abednego ("Servant of Nebo,” another Babylonian god).
 
 
 
The original Hebrew names tell us that these four teenagers must have been raised in godly homes by parents who raised their children to serve the true God.
 
By giving them new names Ashpenaz meant to obliterate their past. This was nothing less than systematic brainwashing. Nebuchadnezzar didn’t want good Jews working for him, he wanted good Babylonians who happened to have a Jewish background.
 
Note that he didn’t overtly force them to change their religion. The whole process just made it very easy to forget. They were being weaned away from their past little by little. Soon they might forget it altogether.
 
Clearly, the goal was for these young men to think and act and speak like the pagans around them. And it might have worked but for one all-important fact:
 
You can change the outside but you can’t change the heart. Here is hope for all Christian parents who worry (and rightly so) about the negative influence of the world all around us. In the end our job is to plant the seed of God’s truth and then trust God to bring in the harvest.
 
Most of us know Romans 12:2, “Do not be conformed to the world.” I love the way J. B. Phillips renders it: “Don’t let the world squeeze you into its mold.” The world will squeeze us. We can’t avoid that. But we don’t have to give in to the pressure.
 
Here, then, is the Babylonian plan to transform these young men:
New Home ISOLATION
 
New Knowledge INDOCTRINATION
 
New Diet COMPROMISE
 
New Names CONFUSION
 
It’s a good plan because it evidently worked with some of the Jewish teenagers. But there were at least four who stood against the tide.
 
Here's the final thing I want you to keep in mind when it comes to how the world tries to seduce the church. 
 
5. They Don't Win!
 
The world will never be successful in seducing the church.  I will admit, as we come to the end of this passage, things appear hopeless. Here you have four teenagers ready to take on the mightiest man in the world. It would seem that they don’t have a chance.
 
But we know they survived with their faith intact or there wouldn’t be a book of Daniel in the Bible. How did they do it? They understood that four plus God equals a majority. When you factor God into the equation, suddenly Nebuchadnezzar doesn’t look so big.
 
Now, I intentionally passed over a key phrase in verse 2 that we need to think about at this point. It’s the little phrase “And the Lord gave.” It was God Who made the decision that Nebuchadnezzar would win the victory. 
It was God Who allowed the holy things of the temple to wind up in a pagan shrine.  It was God Who sent the teenagers of Jerusalem to live in Babylon. 
 
What happened to Jerusalem was no accident. I’m sure the headline in the next issue of the Babylon Sun-Times read, “Nebuchadnezzar takes Jerusalem.” Wrong! He didn’t “take” Jerusalem. God gave it to him, and if God had not given it to him, he would never have taken it at all.
 
This week I ran across a wonderful statement that seems to fit our text and the strange, difficult days in which we live. “Christians should be the calmest people on earth.” What a thought that is. We have no right to run around wringing our hands. Not when our God is on the throne working out his purpose on the earth.
 
The book of Daniel opens with what appears to be a clear triumph of evil over good. Yet God allowed it to happen for his own higher purposes. I’m sure Nebuchadnezzar didn’t know that and I’m sure the Jews had trouble believing it but it was true nonetheless.
 
Now, with that as the setting, one has to wonder what it was that set these four teenagers apart from the others. How did they find the strength to survive in a pagan land?
 
The answer is found in the opening phrase of verse 8.  In the end, it all comes down to the commitmnet of the heart.
 
Nebuchadnezzar could control the environment in which they lived, but he couldn’t touch their hearts.
 
What an insight that is. Their bodies were in Babylon but their hearts were in Jerusalem. They never forgot—not even for one moment—who they were and where they came from. Therefore it didn’t matter where they happened to be—or even what names they happened to be called. The faith of their childhood was tattooed on their hearts and the mightiest man in the world was helpless to do anything about it.
 
So how do we live in Babylon? The same way they did. By putting our hearts in the right place. For us that means that even though our bodies are on earth, our hearts must continually be in heaven. And if our hearts are in heaven, then it doesn’t matter where we happen to be on earth because the world can’t touch us.
 
God used the attempted seduction of Daniel and his friends to prepare them for greater work to come. Did you ever think about how frustrating it must be for Satan to encounter a Christian who has purposed in his heart to not eat at the king's table? 
 
Isn't it interesting that what the Babylonians meant for evil, God meant for good. He put these four young men in a most vulnerable spot because he knew their hearts could stand the test. He even allowed them to be trained in a pagan school so that they might eventually become leaders in the pagan government.
 
 
 
I know it’s easy to be overwhelmed in these days when the world presses in on all sides. Yet we have the words of Jesus in John 17:15, “My prayer is not that you take them out of the world but that you protect them from the evil one.”
 
God has willed that his children should live in the world and yet be preserved from destruction by the world. He puts us in dangerous places like Babylon, and then displays his power on our behalf. God is the One who gave Israel over to Babylon. He uses the world to knock out all of our props so that we will turn back to him.
 
What an important lesson this is to all of us. Israel was defeated, but God was not defeated. God wills that his children survive and thrive in the most difficult circumstances.
 
This is part of what Jesus meant when he said, “I will build my church and the gates of hell will not prevail against it” (Matthew 16:18b). By the way, the phrase “gates of hell” refers to the realm of the dead.
 
Many times when our loved ones die, we feel as if the world itself has come to an end and we wonder (secretly and sometimes out loud) if God has not made some terrible mistake. Or perhaps we wonder if there is any God at all.
 
The Bible reminds us that the last enemy that will be destroyed is death (1 Corinthians 15:26). But that day has not yet come. Until then we live in hope. And we bury our loved ones in the confidence that death will not have the last word.
 
We know this because on Easter Sunday morning Jesus came out of the tomb holding the keys of death and Hades in his hand (Revelation 1:18). In the end death loses and the people of God win.
 
We aren’t there yet. Until Jesus comes back, life will always be a losing game. We keep on filling the cemeteries because our loved ones keep on dying. But it will not always be so.
 
Years ago, one of my deacons at another church gave me a reading called “The Fellowship of the Unashamed.” I am drawn to it because it describes the kind of attitude that will help us to successfully live in Babylon. 
 
According to some sources, it was written by an African pastor who was martyred for his faith. It goes like this:
 
I am a part of the Fellowship of the Unashamed.
 
I have Holy Spirit Power. The die has been cast. I have stepped over the line.
 
The decision has been made. I am a disciple of Jesus Christ.
 
I won’t look back, let up, slow down, back away, or be still.
 
My past is redeemed, my present makes sense, and my future is secure.
 
 
 
I am finished and done with low living, sight walking, small planning, smooth knees, colorless dreams, tame visions, worldly talking, cheap giving, and dwarfed goals.
 
I no longer need preeminence, prosperity, position, promotions, plaudits, or popularity. I don’t have to be right, first, tops, recognized, praised, regarded, or rewarded. I now live by faith, lean on His presence, love by patience, lift by prayer, and labor by power.
 
My pace is set, my gait is fast, my goal is Heaven, my road is narrow,
 
My way is rough, my companions few, my Guide is reliable, my mission clear. I cannot be bought, compromised, detoured, lured away, turned back, deluded or delayed.
 
I will not flinch in the face of sacrifice, hesitate in the presence of adversity, negotiate at the table of the enemy, ponder at the pool of popularity, or meander in the maze of mediocrity.
 
I won’t give up, back up, let up, or shut up until I’ve preached up,
 
prayed up, paid up, stored up, and spoken up for the cause of Christ.
 
I am a disciple of Jesus Christ. I must go until He returns,
 
give until I drop, preach until all know, and work until He stops me.
 
And when He comes to get His own, He will have no problem recognizing me.
 
My colors will be clear.
 
I find it interesting that the writer closes with this reference to clear colors because that is the primary problem with far too many of God's people. 
 
In a day when we are called to stand apart and be separated, we've decided to blend in with the scenery around us.  Our “colors” are not clear because we look so much like everyone else.
 
I think it was Jim Elliot who said, “When it comes time to die, make sure that’s all you have to do.”
 
Daniel was a man like that. He was part of the Fellowship of the Unashamed. His colors were clear. And when he died, the Lord had no trouble finding him.
 
May God help us to live in our Babylon with our hearts in heaven so that when our time comes, we’ll be easy to spot and ready to meet the Lord.
 
Let's pray
Post a Comment